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The 2010 Season In Review - WR

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Which wide receivers scored the most fantasy points? Here is a breakdown of the Top 50 fantasy wide receivers from the 2010 season. Fantasy points (FPS) were calculated using the following formula: one point per reception, one point for every 10 rushing yards compiled, one point for every 10 receiving yards amassed and six points for each rushing or receiving touchdown. Points were not deducted for lost fumbles, and points for passing statistics (gadget plays) were not included.

RK

PLAYER

RUSH ATT

RUSH YDS

RUSH TD

REC

REC YDS

REC TD

FPS

1

Roddy White

1

3

0

115

1,389

10

314.2

2

Brandon Lloyd

1

-18

0

77

1,448

11

286

3

Reggie Wayne

0

0

0

111

1,355

6

282.5

4

Dwayne Bowe

1

4

0

72

1,162

15

278.6

5

Greg Jennings

1

-1

0

76

1,265

12

274.4

6

Calvin Johnson

4

32

0

77

1,120

12

264.2

7

Andre Johnson

2

10

0

86

1,216

8

256.6

8

Hakeem Nicks

0

0

0

79

1,052

11

250.2

9

Mike Wallace

5

39

0

60

1,257

10

249.6

10

Stevie Johnson

0

0

0

82

1,073

10

249.3

11

Santana Moss

5

-6

0

93

1,115

6

239.9

12

Larry Fitzgerald

0

0

0

90

1,137

6

239.7

13

Miles Austin

7

93

1

69

1,041

7

230.4

14

Jeremy Maclin

3

36

0

70

964

10

230

15

Marques Colson

1

1

0

84

1,022

7

228.3

16

Mike Williams (TB)

0

0

0

65

964

11

227.4

17

Terrell Owens

0

0

0

72

983

9

224.3

18

Wes Welker

0

0

0

86

848

7

212.8

19

Mario Manningham

1

2

0

60

944

9

208.6

20

Brandon Marshall

2

3

0

86

1,014

3

205.7

21

DeSean Jackson

16

104

1

47

1,056

6

205

22

Percy Harvin

18

107

1

71

868

5

204.5

23

Davone Bess

1

0

0

80

817

5

191.7

24

Lance Moore

0

0

0

66

763

8

190.3

25

Anquan Boldin

2

2

0

64

837

7

189.9

26

Braylon Edwards

1

4

0

53

904

7

185.8

27

Mike Thomas

12

114

0

66

820

4

183.4

28

Derrick Mason

0

0

0

61

802

7

183.2

29

Pierre Garcon

2

6

0

67

784

6

182

30

Danny Amendola

7

81

0

85

689

3

180

31

Deion Branch

0

0

0

61

818

6

178.8

32

Johnny Knox

1

2

0

51

960

5

177.2

33

Chad Ochocinco

0

0

0

67

831

4

174.1

34

Kenny Britt

0

0

0

42

775

9

173.5

35

Austin Collie

0

0

0

58

649

8

170.9

36

Michael Crabtree

0

0

0

55

741

6

165.1

37

Jabar Gaffney

0

0

0

65

875

2

164.5

38

Hines Ward

1

-2

0

59

755

5

164.3

39

Santonio Holmes

2

17

0

52

746

6

164.3

40

Nate Burleson

7

81

0

55

625

6

161.6

41

Mike Williams (Sea)

1

0

0

65

751

2

152.1

42

Anthony Armstrong

0

0

0

44

871

3

149.1

43

James Jones

0

0

0

50

679

5

147.9

44

Nate Washington

1

-8

0

42

687

6

145.9

45

Eddie Royal

6

61

0

59

627

3

145.8

46

Malcom Floyd

0

0

0

37

717

6

144.7

47

Kevin Walter

0

0

0

51

621

5

143.1

48

Mike Sims-Walker

0

0

0

43

562

7

141.2

49

Robert Meachem

4

14

0

44

638

5

139.2

50

Dez Bryant

1

0

0

45

561

6

137.1

The biggest fantasy surprises? Suiting up for his fourth team after eight forgettable pro seasons, career journeyman Brandon Lloyd finished as the fantasy WR2 thanks to leading the league in receiving yards (1,448) while finishing third (tie) in touchdowns (11) and 10th (tie) in catches (77), which were all career-high numbers. Lloyd also deserves a nod as the most valuable 2010 waiver wire pickup.

A star was born in the suddenly fantasy-relevant Buffalo Bills offense. Third-year pro Stevie Johnson stunned many with a surprising fantasy WR10 finish. He ranked ninth in catches (80), 11th in receiving yards (1,073) and fourth (tie) in touchdowns (10). Johnson also tied a Bills franchise record by scoring in five consecutive games (WeekS 3-7).

Many had expected a bounce-back season from Dwayne Bowe, but he surpassed most expectations, finishing as the fantasy WR4 on the strength of a league-leading 15 touchdown receptions. Although some opposing defenses successfully contained Bowe late in the season – he was worthless from Week 13 through Week 15 – the fifth-year pro still ranked seventh in receiving yards (1,162) and 13th (tie) in receptions (72).

After years of driving fantasy owners crazy with his up-and-down production, Santana Moss produced some consistent fantasy numbers in new Washington Redskins head coach Mike Shanahan’s offense. Moss finished third in receptions (93) and 10th in receiving yards (1,115) and compiled six touchdowns to rank as the fantasy WR11.

Second-year receivers Hakeem Nicks and Mike Wallace both impressed with unexpected Top 10 finishes. Nicks assumed the role of go-to guy in the New York Giants passing attack, amassing 79 catches, 1,052 receiving yards and 11 touchdowns in 13 games played (he missed time because of a leg surgery) to finish as the fantasy WR8. Wallace’s 60 receptions barely ranked in the Top 30 at the position, but he tallied 1,257 receiving yards and 10 touchdown catches to finish as the fantasy WR9.

The biggest fantasy disappointments? The aging Randy Moss was undoubtedly the biggest fantasy bust at the position and arguably the biggest fantasy bust of the season. Did you draft Moss? Isn’t it fun having to decide whether to start or sit your first-round selection each week? The 34-year-old wideout is no longer an elite talent, and opposing defenses can easily neutralize him with a double team. Giving some special meaning to the term journeyman, Moss played for three teams in 2010 - the New England Patriots (three games), the Minnesota Vikings (four games) and the Tennessee Titans (nine games) - amassing a paltry 28 catches for 393 yards and five touchdowns to rank as the fantasy WR74.

Steve Smith (Carolina) compiled his worst fantasy numbers since his 2001 rookie season – 46 catches, 554 receiving yards and two touchdowns to finish as the fantasy WR64 – but the dismal showing was not entirely Smith’s fault. A shoulder injury sidelined Matt Moore for most of the season, forcing the Panthers to start disappointing rookie Jimmy Clausen. He was unable to get the ball to Smith with any consistency whatsoever in Carolina’s pitiful dink-and-dunk festival of a passing attack.

If Anquan Boldin’s dismal showing as the Baltimore Ravens’ designated stud wideout doesn’t convince you that he never will be a true No. 1 fantasy wide receiver, I don’t know what else to tell you. Boldin frequently struggled against opposing defenses’ top cover cornerbacks, and he lost targets to the still-capable Derrick Mason. Boldin finished as just the fantasy WR25, amassing 64 catches for 837 yards and seven touchdowns.

Following his stellar 2009 breakout season, Miles Austin had looked poised to join the ranks of the elite fantasy wideouts and was a trendy early second-round selection. However, Austin’s fantasy stock took a devastating hit when Tony Romo suffered a season-ending broken collarbone in Week 6. Austin had been Romo’s go-to guy, but backup Jon Kitna preferred throwing to just about everyone else but Austin. His fantasy WR13 numbers – 69 receptions for 1,041 yards and seven scores – were respectable but obviously disappointing.

The Top 10 preseason expectations were too high for Brandon Marshall. He underwent offseason hip surgery and had to learn a new offense. Ultimately, the Miami Dolphins’ inconsistent quarterback play was to blame for his up-and-down fantasy production and lack of scoring. Marshall caught 86 passes for just 1,014 yards and three touchdowns to rank as the fantasy WR20.

It looks like Father Time has finally caught up to two receivers that have been popular for years in points-per-reception formats – Hines Ward and Donald Driver. The noticeably slowing Ward, who will turn 35 in March, is coming off his worst season since 2000. Taking a back seat to the younger and speedier wide outs in the Pittsburgh Steelers passing attack, Ward amassed just 59 catches for 755 yards and five touchdowns to finish as the fantasy WR38.

Driver found himself in a similar situation, losing touches to the Packers’ stable of talented up-and-coming young receivers and tight ends. In addition, the 36-year-old Driver was slowed by knee troubles. On the season, Driver snagged 51 balls for 565 yards and four touchdowns to finish as the fantasy WR51, which was his worst showing since 2001.

Who caught the most passes? Roddy White led the league with 115 receptions, and Reggie Wayne was close behind with an AFC-best 111 catches. Santana Moss hauled in 93 passes while Larry Fitzgerald compiled 90 receptions – despite his team’s terrible quarterback situation. Andre Johnson, Brandon Marshall and Wes Welker each snagged 86 balls.

Who caught the most passes in a single game? Reggie Wayne compiled 15 catches for 196 yards in Week 4 against the Jacksonville Jaguars, which was the highest single-game reception total of the season and an Indianapolis Colts franchise record. He also garnered 14 receptions for 200 yards and a touchdown in a Week 13 contest against the Dallas Cowboys. Dwayne Bowe amassed 13 catches for 186 yards and two touchdowns in Week 10 against the Denver Broncos, and he piled up 13 receptions for 170 yards and three touchdowns in a Week 12 outing against the Seattle Seahawks. Roddy White posted a 13 receptions for 111 yards stat line in Week 1 against the Pittsburgh Steelers. Eight different players hauled in 12 passes in a game.

Who amassed the most receiving yards? Brandon Lloyd was one of 16 wideouts to top the 1,000-yard mark, leading the NFL, as mentioned, with 1,448 receiving yards. Roddy White amassed 1,389 yards while Reggie Wayne compiled 1,355 yards. Greg Jennings garnered 1,265 yards, and the emerging Mike Wallace accumulated 1,257 yards.

Did anyone amass 200-plus receiving yards in a single game? Six players did it. Kenny Britt compiled seven catches for 225 yards and three touchdowns in Week 7 against the Philadelphia Eagles, which was the highest single-game receiving yardage total of the season. Terrell Owens amassed 10 catches for 222 yards and one touchdown in Week 4 against the Cleveland Browns. The others: Malcom Floyd (8 catches, 213 yards, 1 TD) in Week 5 during a clash with the Oakland Raiders); DeSean Jackson (4 receptions, 210 yards. 1 TD in Week 14 against the Dallas Cowboys); Roddy White (11 catches, 201 yards, 2 TD) in Week 7 against the Cincinnati Bengals); and Reggie Wayne (14 receptions, 200 yards, 1 TD) in Week 13 against the Dallas Cowboys).

How many 100-yard receiving games? We witnessed 157 100-yard receiving games by 75 different wideouts. Mike Wallace was tops with seven 100-yard games. Andre Johnson and Brandon Lloyd both notched six 100-yard efforts. Miles Austin, Reggie Wayne, Greg Jennings and Dwayne Bowe each topped the 100-yard mark in five contests.

Which team did not have a receiver post a 100-yard game? The Cleveland Browns.

Who scored the most touchdowns? Dwayne Bowe, as mentioned, caught a league-leading 15 touchdown passes and was one of 10 wideouts to amass double-digit scores. Greg Jennings and Calvin Johnson each compiled 12 touchdown receptions. Brandon Lloyd, Hakeem Nicks and Mike Williams (Tampa Bay) each tallied 11 touchdown catches, while Roddy White, Mike Wallace, Stevie Johnson and Jeremy Maclin each found the end zone 10 times.

Who caught the most touchdowns in a single game? The single-game high for touchdown catches was three, and eight different players did it: Anquan Boldin (8 catches, 142 yards, 3 TD) in Week 3 against the Cleveland Browns); Kenny Britt (7 catches, 225 yards, 3 TD) in Week 7 against the Philadelphia Eagles); Lee Evans (6 catches, 105 yards, 3 TD) in Week 7 against the Baltimore Ravens); Calvin Johnson (9 receptions, 101 yards, 3 TD) in Week 8 against the Washington Redskins); Stevie Johnson (8 catches, 137 yards, 3 TD) in Week 11 against the Cincinnati Bengals); Greg Jennings (7 receptions, 152 yards, 3 TD) in Week 11 against the Minnesota Vikings); Dwayne Bowe (13 receptions, 170 yards, 3 TD) in Week 12 against the Seattle Seahawks); and Vincent Jackson (5 receptions, 112 yards, 3 TD) in Week 15 against the San Francisco 49ers).

Any notable individual accomplishments? Roddy White’s league-leading 115 catches set a new Atlanta Falcons franchise record. Dwayne Bowe’s league-leading 15 touchdown receptions set a Kansas City Chiefs franchise record. Bowe was also the first Chief to lead the NFL in touchdown grabs since 1967. Reggie Wayne became just the seventh player in NFL history to amass three or more 100-catch seasons thanks to his AFC-best 111 receptions. Brandon Lloyd’s 11 touchdown catches were the most by a Denver Bronco since 2001. Larry Fitzgerald became the first Arizona Cardinal to post four consecutive 1,000-yard seasons. He also became the team’s all-time reception leader (613). Stevie Johnson became just the sixth player in Buffalo Bills history to compile at least 80 catches in a season.

Greg Jennings became just the seventh player in Green Bay Packers’ history to amass at least 1,000 receiving yards and 10 touchdowns in a single season. Brandon Marshall’s 86 catches tied Mark Clayton (1988) for the second-highest total in Miami Dolphins’ history. Chad Ochocinco became the Cincinnati Bengals all-time leader in touchdown catches (66). Marques Colston joined Joe Horn as the only New Orleans Saints player to amass four 1,000-yard seasons. Hakeem Nicks became just the second player in Giants history to amass at least 12 catches, 130 receiving yards and two touchdowns in a single game (Week 5). Hines Ward became the first Pittsburgh Steelers receiver to surpass the 11,000-yard mark (11,702). He also notched four 100-yard games to set the team record at 29.

How did Mike Williams of the Seattle Seahawks do? Many had laughed when new Seattle head coach Pete Carroll brought his former USC star receiver out of retirement and back to the NFL. Also known as “Big Mike Williams” or just “BMW,” the 6-foot-5, 242-pound Williams finished as the fantasy WR41, catching 65 passes for 751 yards and two touchdowns. He also became the first Seahawk to compile three 10-catch games in a season.

Any high-profile injury busts? As some had predicted, Steve Smith (New York) didn’t come close to matching his career-best numbers from 2009. Smith lost targets to the emerging Hakeem Nicks and Mario Manningham, and missed seven games due to pectoral and knee injuries. On the season, Smith finished with 48 catches for 529 yards and three touchdowns as the fantasy WR59.

The promising Austin Collie was in and out of the starting lineup, because he suffered three concussions over the course of the season. In just nine games played, Collie finished as the fantasy WR35, compiling 58 receptions, 649 receiving yards and eight touchdowns.

Malcom Floyd filled in competently while Vincent Jackson held out, but Floyd missed five outings due to lingering hamstring injuries that also hampered him in a few late season games. Floyd closed out 2010 as the fantasy WR46, compiling 37 catches, 717 receiving yards and six touchdowns.

Everyone knew Sidney Rice was going to miss a good portion of the season due to a very ill-timed operation to repair a hip injury that he had suffered during the 2009 playoffs. Rice amassed 17 catches for 280 yards and two touchdowns to rank as the fantasy WR100.

How did the top rookies do? Fourth-round draft pick Mike Williams (Tampa Bay) was the best and most fantasy relevant of the bunch by a wide margin. He also deserves a nod as one of the biggest surprises at the position. Williams quickly emerged as Josh Freeman ’s go-to guy, catching 65 passes for 954 yards and 11 touchdowns to finish as the fantasy WR16.

Some experts had expected big things from mega-talented first-round pick Dez Bryant, but he was hampered by injuries and the presence of other capable pass-catchers in the Dallas Cowboys offense. Bryant finished as the fantasy WR52, hauling in 45 passes for 561 yards and six touchdowns in 12 games played.

First-round selection Demaryius Thomas had been billed as the heir apparent to Brandon Marshall, but the surprising emergence of Brandon Lloyd in an already talented wide receiver corps hindered Thomas’s development. He played in 10 games, catching 22 balls for 283 yards and two touchdowns to finish as the fantasy WR95.

Second-round pick Arrelious Benn has potential, but he needs more time to develop. Taking a back seat to talented rookie teammate Mike Williams, Benn was a non-factor in the Buccaneers offense all season. He amassed 25 receptions for 395 yards and two touchdowns to close out 2010 as the fantasy WR84.

Second-rounder Golden Tate has some nice raw talent, but his touches were limited in Seattle’s crowded wide receiver corps. On the season, Tate hauled in 21 passes for 227 yards without scoring to finish as the fantasy WR116.

Third-round selection Brandon LaFell’s fantasy stock and development were obviously hindered by Carolina’s dismal passing game. LaFell closed out 2010 as the fantasy WR75, amassing 38 receptions for 468 yards with one score.

Looking ahead to 2011, who are the most fantasy-relevant free agents at the position? Restricted free agents: Sidney Rice (Vikings), Lance Moore (Saints), Steve Smith (Giants), Santonio Holmes (Jets), Malcom Floyd (Chargers), Danny Amendola (Rams), Steve Breaston (Cardinals), James Jones (Packers) and Mike Sims-Walker (Jaguars).

Unrestricted free agents: Vincent Jackson (Chargers), Santana Moss (Redskins), Braylon Edwards (Jets), Terrell Owens (Bengals), Mark Clayton (Rams), Randy Moss (Titans), T.J. Houshmandzadeh (Ravens) and Plaxico Burress (Giants).